Summary On Globalization And Race

749 Words3 Pages
Thomas, Deborah and MKC. 2013. Globalization and Race, in Annual Reviews I- Introduction Main point: In the past two decades, anthropologists have put much of their focus on globalization. However, globalization often causes barriers subjects of interest in anthropology. Summary: Race has often played a large role in globalization. The globalization process is highly screens the economies, social, and political potential of betterment. The author wants to tackle some of the new strategies of governments with newly innovated social aspects. We see how race is a major factor of world modernity, especially in the Americas, which is tied back in with anthropological analysis of globalization. First we discuss how globalization operates to diminish…show more content…
We now know that that assumption is far from the truth. What we were witnessing was fragmented globality. It was an increased but selective form of capital, which also intensified the differences between labor markets across national borders and the uneven integration of global consumer markets. Frederick Cooper argued globalization was more of a discourse than a applicable reality; it may cause change over time but it lacks a perspective of history needed to differentiate between its mechanisms and limits of spatial…show more content…
b- Imperialism’s Second Wave and the Solidification of Scientific Racism Main point: British imperialism helped to solidify the notions of racism. They believed that social Darwinism justified the reason for the separation between the race of superior whites and the race of inferior others. Summary: Racism played a large role in British imperialism. The slaves that they used in their native land were bought to the New World, later known as the United States, which has paved the way for racism. Through the elaboration of the scientific theory, social Darwinism, europeans justified that their features and way of living was much more modern and acceptable than that of their slaves, who were seen as less than human, with “animalistic” features. The European expansion into the New World generated the notions of the norms of racist ideals. Question: Do these foundations of racism still apply to newly globalized nations today? III- New Post-1989 Forms of Governance and
Open Document