Essay On Switzerland Neutrality

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The topic that I will be studying consists in the neutrality of Switzerland and its role in foreign affairs. My research involves in explaining how Switzerland is an active neutral nation by stating historical points, using WWII as a study case and demonstrating Switzerland’s policies in foreign affairs. To begin, Switzerland is a small nation situated at the center of Central Europe and shares a significant historical and cultural measure with Germany, France, Italy and Austria. "Confoederatio Helvetica", is a Latin name originally from the Helvetians, a Celtic tribe, and was Switzerland’s official Latin name. Since the 13th century, Switzerland has not involved in a conflict or war. Moreover, the Old Swiss Confederacy was set up in the first…show more content…
In 1815, at the Vienna Congress, Switzerland's neutrality and boarders were officially pronounced and the Federal constitution of Switzerland was written in 1848; which was reviewed twice in 1874 and…show more content…
First, neutrality in a moral measure signifies “the absence of decided views, expression and/or strong feeling. ” Neutrality has also a scientific connotation, which defines“ the condition of chemicals or electricity being neutral. ” Finally, in international relations neutrality is “the state of not supporting or helping either side in a conflict, disagreement or war .” Moreover, the Swiss Military College, at the Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, studies each year the « security » of Switzerland. In 2005 the Swiss Military College made a survey concerning the long-term public opinion on neutrality and solidarity. In fact, in their survey, the Swiss military found that approximately 25% of Swiss citizens would be in favor in taking sides’ internationally in military conflicts abroad. On the other hand, 55% of Swiss citizens are in favor of taking side in political conflicts abroad yet remain neutral military wise. Finally more than 85% of Swiss citizens think that Switzerland should retain its full neutrality. Yet, according to international law, Switzerland is free to give up its neutrality as well as to redefine
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