Slavery In Richard Wright's Native Son

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Around the 1930’s and 1940’s there was extreme racial judgment against the African American community. They would immediately be put down and racially profiled by many. By Being different from the White people it held them back from living their lives freely. Socially they were led to live a failed lifestyle because of the racial and economic forces that helped mold and poked at the African Americans like Bigger to live up to the typical stereotype. Wright puts Bigger in a hostile , brutal social environment which helps shape Bigger Thomas, and also puts a harsh eye on the Whites of the community. Richard Wright shows in Native Son that the protagonist, Bigger is a symbol of what could happen if society refuses to make opportunity and freedom…show more content…
Wright believed that the foundation of the American society itself was the direct cause. Native Son is an important in learning that the American social structure must change before the needy, oppressed and held back masses of minority’s rise up in anger against those who hold power. Slavery was a traumatic time in the lives of millions of blacks in the U.S, who had to go through this experience for over two hundred years in…show more content…
She keeps him of his identity which leaves room him to do the natural thing and create one. Bigger also haste control over Buddy, but he doesn’t half to use violence to do it because Buddy is attracted to everything that Bigger does. Wright also foreshadows later events of the novel in the very opening scene. The black rat is a symbol of the white peoples view of Bigger; an annoying dangerous monster who doesn’t belong in this civilized environment. So basically Bigger must gain control over the rat because of his compulsion to commit violent acts. Bigger’s killing the rat is a symbol for his destruction of himself that he created using the violence that he
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