Symbolism Of Prayer In Stonewall Jackson's Camp

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John Buttre's 1866 engraving of Prayer in Stonewall Jackson's Camp captures Jim Lewis in the portrait. This engraving is copyright free and copies are available online and at various Civil War-related museums. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- February 1862, roughly six months after Douglass wrote about them in his newsletter. Frederick Douglass’ sources in 1861 as an African-American person Parker who claimed to have seen “one regiment at Manassas of 700 black men from Georgia, 1000 men from South Carolina, and about 1000 men with him from Virginia, destined for Manassas when he ran away, Parker told his story to many people, including giving an extended interview to the New York Evening…show more content…
Upon Jackson's death, Jim was allowed to lead his horse, Superior, as part of the funeral processions in Richmond and Lexington. Jim continued to serve with Sandie Pendleton, another of Jackson's aides, until Pendleton's death in 1864. He reportedly returned to Lexington and died soon after. The circumstances of his death and his final resting place are entirely unknown. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ The magnificent new movie (Gods and Generals) raises a related issue relationship between slave and Thomas Stonewall Jackson, Jim Lewis is played in the movie by Matthew Broderick as “Big Jim” Lewis." Jim Lewis may have been a pupil of Jackson's black Sunday school and seems to have offered his services to Jackson with the permission of his unknown owner. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Jim Lewis sure knew the general backward and forwards! One day he astounded Jackson's staff by having packed all the general's things and saddled Little Sorrel. Shortly, the general ordered a surprise move from camp. The aides asked Lewis how he knew the general planned to…show more content…
A war of words passed between Jim and the general, but armed with good intentions and a genuine love for the horse, Jim was able to win out, and another mount was brought out for General Jackson. The exchange was indicative of the confidential relationship between the two men. General Jackson would rarely argue with anyone; he would make up his mind, issue an order, and expect absolute obedience. This was not always the case with Jim Lewis, however. The fact that the general would tolerate disagreement from a servant, a slave of all people, particularly when it came to something as critical as his choice of horse, was a most remarkable thing and had been observed by all. Jackson’s trust in Jim’s good judgment was observed on more than this occasion as
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