Syntax In Fenollosa's 'No Road'

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“No Road” employs an authentic syntax which means what it says. It is therefore paraphrasable because the function of meaning which calls for permanent contents are not distorted but fulfilled. The forms of syntax have essence. There is a respect for the rules of discourse and there is the unfolding of the thought from stage to stage indicating that conceptual thought is at the base of the poem. The resigned and the melancholy tone suggests the beauty of love which is now ended, but the emotion does not peter out into sentimentality but the poet exercises a strict control over his medium. The rhyme scheme, though never obstructive, nevertheless, contributes to this control; so too does the rhythm, but the rhythm is not “all embracing “as in…show more content…
Two more examples to drive home this point from the Movement verse. One is from Holloway’s “Elegy for an Estrangement” (Conquest, NL…show more content…
They moved to Roman Catholicism as they thought that the evil that troubled Western Civilization had crept with the inception of Protestantism during the Renaissance. The difference in attitude to orthodox Christianity between the modernists and the Movement poets can be viewed in Larkin’s “Church Going”. This is the representative poem of the Movement group which shows the attitude towards religion and social identity. Larkin does not believe in the idea of an afterlife. In his “Next Please”, he suggests that in the wake of death no water breed or break. Amis in the “Huge Artifican” considers God as a novelist. They did not look Christianity or God as the saviors of
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