Szilard's Petition

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A Petition to the President of the United States by Leo Szilard and Cosigners was an appeal to the President (Commander-in-Chief) from the scientists who developed the atomic bomb, to consider other options instead of using it, in a surprise attack on Japan in 1945. The scientists lead by Szilard appealed to the President to first use the option of disclosing the power of the atomic bomb and requesting Japanese surrender, or if not heeded the atomic bomb would be used. A Petition to the chairman of the United States, the author of the petition discusses why the utilization of atomic bombs is not a good idea. Szilard’s drug ab aims his expertise and knowledge to abide valid points behind his petition. He is a working scientist in the eye socket…show more content…
An appeal to ethos relies on the credibility of the author. The first point that Szilard’s makes in his petition is about his and the fellow scientist, who also signed the petition, background in the field of atomic power. We, the undersigned scientists, permit been working in the field of atomic power for a number of years. (Szilard, 1945). An appeal to pathos relies on the audience’s emotions and feelings. Atomic power testament provides the nations with new means of destruction. The atomic bombs at our disposal mean only the first step in this direction and in that respect is almost no limit to the destructive power which will become available in the course of this development. Szilard organized his letter in a logical way hence the intended message is brought out emphatically. The letter opens with a strong introduction that indicates the dangers posed to the American nation as a result of the discovery of the atomic bomb, and its subsequent placement into the hands of the American military. The author then explains that the atomic bombs were useful in case America was at the threat of being attacked by the same weapons, but the phase of war then, did not favor the US using atomic bombs on Japan. Szilard recommends alternatives that should be pursued and that America reexamines its position on the use of atomic bombs. Finally, Leo gives out reasons why it would be a bad idea for America to attack
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