Tale Of Two Cities Rhetorical Analysis

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A Tale of Two Cities, written by Charles Dickens, surrounds the cities of Paris and London during the late 1700’s. The novel takes place during the French Revolution, a period of social and political upheaval in France and England. While peasants died in the streets from hunger, aristocrats had more money and power than they knew what to do with. A Tale of Two Cities describes, in detail, the poverty of the time period, as well as the struggle of a people able to overcome oppression. The novel is largely based off of occurrences Dickens experienced during his childhood. Throughout the novel, the audience is able to infer what the author’s personal feeling towards the revolution is. This is shown through the personification of the guillotine, a tone of uncertainty, and use of violence through oppression. Therefore, the speaker is expressing his view on the revolution, while also predicting the resurrection of France.
The passage introduces the final chapter of the novel, “The Footsteps Die Out for Ever.” Within the passage the speaker describes six tumbrils rolling down the streets of Paris. Riding in one of these tumbrils is Sydney Carton,
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Throughout the novel the author expresses his personal view on the French Revolution through the personification of the guillotine, a tone of uncertainty, and use of violence through oppression. The novel illustrates the story of a people able to overcome an oppressive government through the use of violence. The personification of the guillotine characterizes the chaotic nature of the revolution, by portraying a need of power often seen in the peasants. By using a tone of uncertainty the speaker warns the audience of the danger of using violent methods to overcome violence. If the peasants are not able to make peace with the aristocracy, France cannot be
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