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Tchaikovsky Symphony 6 Essay

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Symphony Six was written between February and August of 1893 by Pyotr-ilyich Tchaikovsky (“Symphony No. 6”). Tchaikovsky is “widely considered the most popular Russian composer in history. His works include The Sleeping Beauty and The Nutcracker” (“Pyotr-ilyich Tchaikovsky”). Symphony Six by Pyotr-ilyich Tchaikovsky was a collaboration of political views, cultural influence, and personal experience. Tchaikovsky pushed against a prominent cultural theme of his time, nationalism by writing songs based on a timeless ideaology not related to national ideology. He seperated himself from the government through his music. Passion is one of my most significant themes in his work. As this is Tchaikovsky's last and final composition, this is one of…show more content…
He held this position for four years, and through this experience he continued his strong interest in music. At the age of 21, Tchaikovsky took music lessons at the Russian Musical Society. Only a couple months later, he became a student to the St. Petersburg Conservatory, gaining the title of the school's first composition student. Throught his time at the conservatory, “in addition to learning... Tchaikovsky gave private lessons to other students. In 1863, he moved to Moscow, where he became a professor of harmony at the Moscow Conservatory” (bio.com). He began publicly performing in 1865; soon after, he established his name with his piece entitled, Piano Concerto No.1 in B-flat Minor. Towards the end of his career he resigned from the Moscow Conservatory in 1878, and solely used his time to compose more prolifically. He passed away on November 6, 1893, in St. Petersburg. (Biography.com) This piece is categorized in the classical genre. One vital characteristic of Classically styled music is having a clearer and less complex texture in comparison to Baroque music (“Classical Period”). Classical music also tends to have a lighter vibe, the sounds are more angelic and delicately composed (“Classical Period
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