Technology In Ayn Rand's Fahrenheit 451, And Anthem

675 Words3 Pages
"Good science fiction is intelligent.” It asks big questions that are on people's minds. It's not impossible. It has some sort of root in the abstract."-Nicolas Cage. The quote by Nicolas Cage includes that science fiction is not impossible, this is how many writers also portray science fiction. They include that it is just an insight into the future of technology and society. Each portion of writing, The Pedestrian, Introduction to Fahrenheit 451, and Anthem acquire elements pertaining to Science Fiction, including a futuristic society and theories about technology. Practically all science fiction originates in the future, and includes a futuristic society. Anthem, The Pedestrian, and the Introduction to Fahrenheit 451 are no exception. Anthem is set in a society of socialism, while Fahrenheit 451 and The Pedestrian is…show more content…
For a book, short story, or article to be classified as science fiction it is required to be based upon technology and where it will take the world in the future. Ayn Rand's novel, "Anthem" is proposing the theory of technology taking the world for the worst. As the book states, "The flame of the candle stands still in the air." This is meaning that no light bulbs or modern technology is present, because of extreme digression in intelligence. It shows that science fiction includes theories of technology carrying the world towards digression or progression.The short story of "The Pedestrian" by Ray Bradbury also poses a theory about technology. As the short story states, "As he passed the front window of the car he looked in. As he had expected, there was no one in the front seat, no one in the car at all." This is an example of the technology present in Bradbury's theory. It shows that even in short stories that are science fiction a theory of technology is still present. Therefore, without discrimination of the writing type of science fiction, a technological theory is

More about Technology In Ayn Rand's Fahrenheit 451, And Anthem

Open Document