History: The Industrial Revolution

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The Industrial Revolution was the pathway that paved the way for many advances in today’s society. This revolution stemmed from the aftermath of the American Civil War and Reconstruction. Before the Industrial Revolution, manufacturing and creation of products was done in the homes of citizens, using ineffective tools, such as hands or simple machinery. As products were manufactured in the homes of citizens, more time was spent working to make an additional income. The development of different technology, like steam-powered boats, played a huge role in the Industrial Revolution. This revolution was one that bettered the means of transportation, communication, and made way for new ideas to be brought up. The Industrial Revolution brought forth…show more content…
In a free market economy, the government does not intervene with the production of materials. This idea of a government left room for merchants to create high quality goods and increase their wealth. One lasting result that was possible because of the Industrial Revolution was the establishment of cities. Due to the revolution, the majority of labor in Europe was located in the cities and this had a detrimental effect on the population. In London, the population was approximately 1 million people, and that is almost double the population prior to the Industrial Revolution. The idea of urbanization encouraged new industries and these became the wealth of the nation. Although the cities seem to be good and terms work and employment, sanitation and these areas was a problem. Diseases such as tuberculosis, cholera and typhoid spread like a wild fire in contaminated area. The unsanitary nature also had a bad effect on the life expectancy of the people living in the…show more content…
Children and women were seen as cheap, unskilled labor, so their services was needed as one of the main priorities of the factories was to minimize cost of production. The changes that came along with Industrial Revolution also included the "change" in time. People were now practically forced to gain a proper grasp on the concept of time. There were work schedules that were ingrained and impressed into the minds of the workers and this strained are rigid work discipline to emerge. Throughout the world, it seemed as though the Industrial Revolution had an effect. In continents such as Europe, North America, Asia, and Africa, people participated and became a part of the dreadful work
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