Tess Of The D Urbervilles Fate Analysis

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Theresa’s evolutionary path from an innocence daughter of a mature woman Basically, the world of Tess of the D’Urbervilles, virtue, purity and innocence reflect the lifestyle that she respects and adopts it. Although her life is seized by unfortunate events that overshadow her happiness, Tess does not give up its moral culture. The novel presents Tess from the beginning as a modest girl with "large innocent eyes" , while her father walks by the fertility ritual of May-Day, which begins her portrayal as a Nature goddess, and the rural women as symbols of pagan innocence, he shout enthusiastically that his name has gained significance valued. Tess embarrassed, she tries to excuse her father from the mockery of the other…show more content…
Her ability to endure so much at such a young age builds her character so that she becomes a powerful force in the novel. Fate plays a predominate role in what happens to Tess. The acknowledgement of the role of fate is summarized by the locals in the small town as "It was to be." Even Tess realizes that she and her family are in a tough spot when Prince, the family horse, is killed and she must go to the Stoke-d'Urbervilles for financial recover. Fate has a more impersonal connotation than destiny, and is usually perceived as a more hostile force. Tess makes several attempts to correct her "faults"; she wants to kill herself to free Angel from their marriage, her refusal to ask Angel's parents for any additional money during Angel's visit to Brazil, the vow to Angel to end their marriage. She is determined to be independent and ready to sacrifice her comfort for the good of others. This makes her selfless and on a morally higher…show more content…
This is almost Hardy's metaphor for life, no one can escape their fate, and so they should live and love as best they can before death. Fate has taught her that no happiness can last, so she does not hope for much. Tess receives her fate as a sacrificial victim, lying down on the altar like a d'Urberville on his tomb or Christ on his cross. The fantasy is shattered and the truth strikes Angel. The policemen give Tess this one last kindness at least, and she is allowed to dream a little longer before she faces her own fate. Tess wakes up among Nature and accepts her fate as the sacrifice for sins not her own. She has tragically learned that no happiness lasts, and all that matters is to make peace with yourself and with your past. Tess has been executed for murder, and the black flag at the prison indicates to anyone looking up at it that an execution has just taken place. At the end of the novel, the contrast between Tess, the innocent girl, pure, virtuous and naivety of the early chapters and Tess, the mature woman from the last chapters, whose fate has not granted the right to a lasting happiness, is evidenced by the negative events, that unlucky Tess has felt since early
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