3.4 Action Research Methodology

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Methodology serves to explain the explicit and implicit assumptions adopted by the researcher during the entire research process. Methodology serves as the foundation upon which the entire research is built. The chosen research methodology then identifies, to a large extent, the research methods for data collection and data analysis (Creswell, 2003; Denzin and Lincoln, 2000).

3.4 Action Research
Action research has been selected as an Inductive, qualitative methodology that is capable of exploring both facts and the meanings attributed to a social situation by the actors.
Action research has been understood by board researchers in a diversity of habits but there are four topics in the literature. First topic emphases on the reason of the
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It is a qualitative research technique for the report of difficult social behaviour from a sociological attitude. In grounded theory, the researcher is encouraged to develop some level of abstraction, objectivity and sensitive to words and statements throughout the research process (Patton, 1990).
Grounded theory is an Inductive, qualitative methodology that is capable of exploring both facts and the meanings attributed to a social situation by the actors. It is explicitly theory building. The categories and concepts are grounded in the data, which gives them validity in the real world, but the interpretation and construction of theory results from the researcher's interaction with the data. In grounded theory, the researcher is encouraged to develop some level of abstraction, objectivity and sensitive to words and statements throughout the research process (Patton, 1990). It is therefore worth considering grounded theory methodology for examining managerial
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A method is a realistic application of preparing research. Regardless of the philosophical stance or paradigm of enquiry adopted in a research project, it is possible to use a combination of research methods when collecting data (Howell, 2013).
Saunders et al., (2007) identify two main kinds of data that emerge in a research project. They are primary data gathered for the specific purpose of the project and secondary data, which are collected from other sources mainly from academic journals, articles and text books. Primary data can be collected through a number of different methods outlined below:
 Questionnaire: As observed by Collis and Hussey (2003), questionnaire is a record of wisely organised questions, selected after substantial testing, with an opinion to causing dependable replies from a selected sample. There are two types of questionnaires. First is self-administered questionnaires which are managed electronically through the internet or intranet, sent to respondents or delivered by hands to each respondent and gathered later and the second is interviewer administered, recorded on the base of each respondent's reply (Saunders et al.,
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