The Abolish Movement

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The Abolish Movement in the United States was an effort to end slavery in a nation that valued personal freedom and believed all men were created equal. There was a side of abolitionist and non-abolitionist. The Period of the Abolish Movement In my paper I will talk about the Abolish Movement. The Abolishment Movement was a period of time where there were anti-slavery people who wanted freedom for slaves. Abolitionist ideas became increasingly prominent in Northern churches and politics beginning in the 1830s, which contributed to the regional animosity between North and South leading up to the Civil War. The goal of the abolitionist movement was the immediate emancipation of all slaves and the end of racial discrimination and segregation.…show more content…
In 1848, the first Women’s Rights convention was held in Seneca Falls, New York. Women were often denied the opportunity to speak at the Abolish Movement abolitionist meetings. Women’s equality and abolition became inextricably linked in the minds of many southerners. In 1852 Harriet Beecher Stowe, authored the novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin. Stowe’s book was criticized and eventually became behind in the south but a best seller in the north. The novel presented a view of slavery, filled with scenes such as that of the slave Eliza escaping with her baby across the icy Ohio River. From the 1830s until 1870, the abolitionist movement attempted to achieve immediate emancipation of all slaves. Abolitionists became increasingly strident in their condemnations of slave owners and "the peculiar institution of slavery. Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation declaring all slaves in Rebel territory are free on January 1, 1863. 1854-1861, Bleeding Kansas was a series of violent events involving abolitionists and pro-Slavery factions that took place in Kansas Territory. Dred Scott Court Decision which stated that slaves were not citizens but the property of their owners and that Congress has no authority to outlaw slavery in…show more content…
By 1835, the society had received substantial moral and financial support from African-American communities in the North and had established hundreds of branches throughout the free states, flooding the North with antislavery literature, agents, and petitions demanding that Congress end all federal support for slavery. By 1854 William Lloyd Garrison and his followerd were convinced that since slavery 's influence had corrupted all of society, a revolutionary change in America 's spiritual values was required to achieve emancipation. Garrison added an insistence on equal rights for women within the movement and a studious avoidance of corrupt political parties and churches. Within the Garrison wing of the movement, female abolitionists became leaders of the nation 's first independent feminist movement. In 1865, the end of the civil war the 13th amendment is added to the Constitution abolishing slavery. In the upper south during the 1920s, the abolitionist movement did not coalesce into a militant crusade until the 1830s. During the
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