The All Powerful Force In Shakespeare's Romeo And Juliet

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The All Powerful Force
“Accept the things to which fate binds you, and love the people with whom fate brings you together, but do so with all your heart.” Marcus Aurelius, Roman emperor 161-180 A.D. Many people believe in destiny, and that everyone was meant for something. Shakespeare based his play Romeo and Juliet off of the concept of fate and destiny. In his play, the main characters are guided by an all powerful and inescapable force, called fate. In Romeo and Juliet the theme of fate has brought the two main characters together in the most unintentional way. After Mercutio’s notorious queen mab speech, Romeo has an aside that overtly states fate having a larger role in the story. He says, “I fear too early, for my mind misgives
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Throughout this play, Shakespeare has given countless examples of how fate has a larger and more in-depth grasp on the story than other themes or ideas. Fate has brought the two “star crossed lovers” together, and it also spells their end. By the first scene, the reader is already given an idea of how big of a role fate has in this story from Romeo’s aside, and this is only further enhanced as the story progresses. The relationships between characters throughout the story have tiny details of how fate has a more prominent role. Relationships between Romeo, Juliet and the Friar are some of the most potent and detailed in Romeo and Juliet. The story would be completely different without them. Another way that fate has contributed to the overall depth and genius of this story, is how the reader interprets the word. Fate also means the end or death of someone, and Romeo and Juliet’s fate has forever changed the lives of the Montagues and Capulets, disintegrating their rivalry. Change is one of the big themes in Romeo and Juliet, and fate plays right into that theme making it very noticeable and potent. “Accept the things to which fate binds you, and love the people with whom fate brings you together, but do so with all your heart.” Marcus Aurelius, Roman emperor 161-180
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