The Great Gatsby Alive Analysis

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The Great Gatsby is a story of elegance and public display of wealth, which eventually is shot down, quite literally in terms of The Great Gatsby, and fades away tragically. It seems impossible to have a story of such intense fame and notoriety that does not end in a disastrous or unfortunate ending, which could be seen as ironic. The people who try the hardest and seem to have it all always end up dissatisfied in the end. These people often work themselves to death, in search of completion, rather than look to themselves to become content. “Is the American dream alive,” is not the question to ask when contemplating the ambitions of the American people. The American dream is alive and well, and has been for sixty years, but instead ask “is…show more content…
This is the essential driving force of both the American dream and Jay Gatsby. Gatsby’s whole life is devoted to Daisy, without her even knowing it. He searches endlessly for her in Chicago newspapers, hoping to find her again (Fitzgerald 84). Eventually, he builds a mansion, right across the lake from her, just so he can be near her. Every night, a green light at the end of Daisy and Tom Buchanan’s dock keeps Gatsby aware of how close he is to having Daisy: “Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgastic future that year by year recedes before us” (Fitzgerald 189). The whole source of the American dream is want, wealth and love are just an effect of desire. All dreams start with the want for a different way of life, which is made available by money or love, but it is the initial desire of something new that starts the dream: “In the 1920s, the American Dream started morphing from the right to create a better life to the desire to acquire material things. This change was described in the F. Scott Fitzgerald novel, The Great Gatsby” (Amadeo). Desire is the trigger that motivates the American dream. It starts the ambitious behavior to gain…show more content…
In terms of The Great Gatsby, Jay searches his whole life for Daisy, and when he finally gets her, she is indecisive with him and eventually, he is murdered. Though nothing Jay Gatsby did directly caused him to die, the actions of his lover did. He took the blame for her mistake, accidentally killing her husband’s mistress, which resulted in his own murder, motivated by misunderstanding and revenge. This correlates to the concept of the American dream, due to the likeliness of it ending in tragedy. Gatsby was never allowed to achieve his true dream, which sees the case in many American’s opinion. “Less than twenty percent of Americans say they 're living the American Dream,” concluding the point that no matter how hard you work, it never results in exactly what you desire (Carter). The goals citizens are looking to achieve today are dreams of the past, but not financially or lawfully perceptible: you must be aware that the infrastructure and resources of the past are either gone, much more difficult to access
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