The Anti-Immigration Movement In The United States

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Social movements take years and years to form. In the United states there have neuromas anti immigration movements that have prevented safe living standers for immigrants. From before it begins the Untied States has been a nation of immigrants. In 1607 the Virginia company of London sent a 34 Man crew to the new world efforts to find new land. These first ever settlers were the first immigrants to enter the Untied States. Immigrates would continue to flow into the US till the late 1800’s when the first immigration policies were created. The first immigrants to come to the US were seeking economic opportunities. However, because the price of passage was steep, about half or more of the white Europeans who made the voyage did so by becoming…show more content…
The Ku Klux Klan, a new American group wanted to ensure the protection of Whites in America. After intense lobbying from the KKK and nativist movement the United States, Congress was forced to pass the Emergency Quota Act. This bill was the first to place numerical quotas on immigration. It capped the inflow of immigrations to 357,803 (ICE) for those arriving outside of the western hemisphere. However, this bill was only temporary as Congress began debating a more permanent bill. The Immigration Act of 1924, was first permanent resolution. This law reduced the number of immigrants able to arrive from 357,803, the number established in the Emergency Quota Act, to 164,687. Though this bill did not fully restrict immigration, it considerably curbed the flow of immigration into the United States. Congress knew this wouldn’t cure the ant immigration stance of the country, but believed it would be a fair…show more content…
The Klan 's increasing reputation for violence led the more prominent citizens, such as senators and mayors to drop out. criminals and the dispossessed looking for a new acceptance began to fill the ranks. Like many social movements local chapters proved difficult to monitor and direct the message. In disgust, of the lack of control many high ranking officers officially disbanded the organization and additionally the vast majority of local groups followed their lead. Some number of local units continued to operate but were eventually disbanded or sent into hiding by the influx of federal officers attempting to end their movement. Form many years from 1870 in till 1915, the Klan remained in till William J. Simmons, a lifelong Klan member was inspired to revive the Ku Klux Klan after seeing the movie Birth of A Nation. When "Birth of a Nation" opened in Atlanta, he ran an advertisement for the Klan next meeting in the Atlanta newspaper. The timing was perfect; the United States was struggling to meet the new challenges imposed by a massive influx of immigrants. Many of whom were unable to speak
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