Autistic Brain Development

1386 Words6 Pages
The autistic brain has several defining features that are a direct result of the differences in the development of the brain and how it functions. During the beginning years of a child’s development, certain dynamic brain changes must occur in order for them to develop basic motor skills and functions. In comparison to typically developing children, these changes and the rate at which the brain develops are very different in children with autism spectrum disorders. As a result of these differences, over 96% of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) exhibit atypical behavioural responses to sensory information report sensitivities in multiple sensory disciplines. Comparable to the wide-range of spectrum severity that is seen in the…show more content…
As humans, we spend 90 percent of our lives indoors and sensory design recognizes the need for these indoor spaces to be conducive to required functional needs of the wide range of users (Klepeis et al., 2001). This paper discusses the internal model of the autistic brain and how the differences in development can cause various sensory impairments. It also discusses the importance of understanding the effects of sensory stimulation on individuals with ASD. Additionally, it will outline the importance of incorporating sensory focused design strategies into interior spaces and provide strategies for implementing this technique into the built…show more content…
In order for the body to be able to perform simple tasks like moving your hands, the brain must develop the relationship between fine motor skills and their association with the different parts of the body. This development typically begins to occur when a child is around 2 months old, as they are able to start moving on their own and associating different actions with body movements. As the child becomes aware of the extent of their mobility, the brain begins to send signals as motor commands, which results in the body’s association with things such as having an itch and raising your hand to your head to scratch it. By eight months, children are typically able to grasp objects and push themselves on their hands and knees and at one year many children are learning to stand unsupported while gaining muscle control in their back and legs. As children continue to grow and develop, hand-eye coordination is being fine-tuned and eventually the dramatic growth in the development of physical skills result in the increased capacity to learn new cognitive skills (Miller et al., 2018). Dynamic brain changes are happening during the beginning years of development, however, these changes and the rate of development are very different in children with autism spectrum disorders in comparison to typically developing
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