The Awaudh State: The Oudh State

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INTRODUCTION The Awadh State or Oudh state was a princely state during the British Raj until 1856. The capital of Oudh State was in Faizabad from 1722 to 1775, the British Agents officially known as 'residents ', had their seat in Lucknow. Lucknow became capital under the reign of Nawab Wazir ul Mumalik or Asif ud daula Muhammad Yahia Amani. Oudh joined other Indian states in an upheaval against British rule in 1858 during one of the last series of actions in the Indian rebellion of 1857. [1] Under the leadership of the fourth Nawab…show more content…
In 1350 AD different parts of the Awadh region were ruled by the Delhi Sultanate. Then for about eighty-four years (from 1394 to 1478) Awadh was part of the Sharqi Sultanate of Jaunpur, Emperor Humayun made it a part of the Mughal Empire around 1555. During the Mughal period, the emperors began to appoint Nawabs to ensure good governance of their provinces. Mohammad Amir Saadat Khan also called Burhan-ul-Mulk a Persian adventurer was appointed as the Nazim of Lucknow, one of the crucial provinces’ of that time. [8] In 1722 he established his court in Faizabad, near Lucknow. The Nawabs of Lucknow were in fact the Nawabs of Awadh for 125 years; Lucknow became the capital of their realm later. The style and culture of the court were redefined by the ruler, Asaf-Al-Daulah (1775-97). Traveller, Thomas Twinning wrote “Awadh court was at its most magnificent under Asaf Al-Daulah” [9] The treaty of 1801 formed an arrangement that was very beneficial to the Company. They were able to use Awadh 's vast treasuries. In addition, the revenues from running Awadh 's armed forces brought them useful revenues while it acted as a buffer state. The Nawabs were ceremonial kings and had little influence over matters of state. By the mid-19th century, the British had taken direct control.…show more content…
In 1960 the extent was from the base of the sub Himalaya Mountains, in a direction from north-west to south-east, until it reached the Ganges. Its greatest length was about 270, and its breadth was 160 miles. [11] It comprised roughly of the broad, flat, fertile plain between the Himalaya and the Ganga
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