The Bhakti Movement In Hindu

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Both Babar and Humayun had broad visions and inclination to support Islam and Hinduism. However, owing to their short rule, not many positive steps could be initiated. Akbhar in his time had abolished the tax on non-Muslims, called the Jizya, to be paid by adult, free, sane males. He believed that no single religion could claim monopoly over truth. Thus he respected all the religions practiced by his subjects. Later exemplifying syncretism in his time, he propounded Din-i Ilahi in 1582, which incorporated the best virtues of both Islam and Hinduism primarily. He wanted to come up with a faith which would unite his subjects who were mostly divided due to their religious differences. Hindu epics like Mahabharata, Ramayana, and vedic literature…show more content…
Like Sufism it stood for intense personal devotion and complete self-surrender to God, it believed in brotherhood of man and equality of all religions. The roots of the Bhakti Movement can be traced to the Upanishads, the Puranas and the Bhagvad Gita. Islam with its liberal outlook, equality of status among its followers, and concept of one God, posed great threat to Hindu society that was suffering from ritualism, rigid caste system, evils of untouchability and multiplicity of gods and goddesses. In this situation many lower class Hindus were attracted by the outlook of Islam in these respects. They were also tempted to adopt Islam which could afford them better status in society and a less cumbersome religion. But at this critical juncture the preachers of Bhakti Movement tried to bring harmony among various religions, they often condemned the Hindu caste system. Preachers like Kabir were greatly touched by both the Hindu philosophy, Sufism and preaching of saints, he considered all religions as one and same. He aimed at bringing about harmony among all communities, as he believed that true faith could be attained by purity and genuineness of spirit, and not by Shastric norms, rituals, religious rites, pilgrimages, rigid penance, or caste…show more content…
I do not claim that syncretism was completely absent in the medieval period, rather my understanding is that religious syncretism was not achieved in absolute terms, maybe medieval period was the one that achieved maximum syncretism in India’s history, but, that much was not enough, if it would have been perfect it would not have drifted to the situation that prevails today. What I reckon is that there are elements facilitating and obstructing religious syncretism which have existed simultaneously over the years, even today these elements are fighting from their respective sides, and this tussle will continue until religion ceases to
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