The Big Fish Analysis

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The simplicity of the cartoon does a fine justice to offer an insight on the intricacy and the visibility of the segregated social groups in our society. The cartoon elucidates the partitioning of different groups based on power, resource, and status with those who encompass the elite group, those who encompass the unjustified and underrepresented groups, and those who encompass the intermediate group that either oscillates towards one side or remains stagnant and satisfied with the status they already occupy. The big fish serves as a paradigm for those civilians occupying the elite group. The members in this group, according to Miller, establish the hegemonic society and attain the greatest influence in determining the culture’s overall outlook…show more content…
Representatives of this hierarchical status may argue that it is beneficial to have inequality. As Wright and Rodgers express, no one is going to hustle and no one is going to be motivated without inequality, thus resulting in the destruction of the society (2011). As represented in the cartoon, each fish is subjected to the same rules and environmental necessities with the indication of the same basic needs of hunger. Fair play, in this case, does not take the size of the fish into account. Therefore the big fish, with the greatest power, size, and resource, is satisfied with the already existing and functioning culture. Therefore, for this elitist group, this type of culture is fair and beneficial for everyone. Things are just the way they are supposed to be, thus reinforcing the hegemonic ideals of society and culture (Johnson,…show more content…
These individuals have minimal say and minimal influence in the way the society is operated. With regards to the size of the fish, the smallest one, being the most deviant of the three in term of its size, is powerless and is unable to compete with those who obtain the greater power and the greater size. This maldistribution of power and resource gives rise to permanent inequality (Miller, 2013). Permanent inequality function in a cyclic manner with those in the bottom remain in the bottom and those at the top remain at the top and this cycle continues for generations. The ascriptive characteristic that one is born into predetermines their social status and role in the society (Harro, 2000). Therefore, those born into impoverishment will most likely encompass that role for their entire life, thus continuing the cycle. The unjust world, according to those who encompass this submissive status, is set out to eradicate their ideals and beliefs of an equitable world, where everyone practices fair share. In fair share, there is a focus on equality and shared dignity; there is enough resource, status, and power for everyone. These individuals are often maltreated as the targets by agent forces, and their voices are not heard therefore, their ideas are ignored and silenced (Johnson, 2010). Additionally, in order to survive and function in the society, the
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