The Black Death In Europe

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In the history of Europe, the Black Death or the Great Mortality has always been one of the most significant and destructive natural disaster, it was so pernicious that it had killed about 25% to 50% of the population in only four years. Most people in Europe did not have the resistance to the plague because it was originated in Asia, the trades between Asia and Europe carried flea-infested rats, as a result, disease like bubonic plague was brought to Europe for the first time. Due to the trades, the plague spread all over Europe very quickly in the mid-fourteenth century. The Black Death was momentous not only because of its significantly high death rate, but also for its impact on European society, economy, and politics. Once the plague broke out and shown its threat, people in the society began living for the moment, some threw themselves with unrestraint into sexual and alcoholic binge, while the wealthy and powerful people fled to their country estate trying to evade the plague. The Black Death also showed how selfish everyone was, they care for nobody but themselves, a majority of the people abandoned their own family, houses, and communities to avoid from getting infected. Likewise, sick or infected people were…show more content…
The decline in wages, no equal rights, and flat charge were the main factors of peasant revolt like the Jacquerie and Ciompi that happened in France. The nobles felt threatened by the rebellion, King Richard II tried to make promises to calm the peasants, but he then reneged and arrested the rebels, however, he did eliminate the poll tax trying to end the social upheaval. There were many political issues during the days in the Black Death which characterized the later European
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