The Caesar Civil War

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The roman civil war is not just one war it is a set of wars that brought about the end of the Roman Republic and built up the Roman Empire. There is the Caesar Civil War and the Octavian battle which I will be focusing on. In my opinion those are the two main battles of the Roman Empire since the Caesar Civil War was what brought about his assassination and the Octavian battle was the last of the Roman Civil Wars and the end of the Roman Republic. There were many factors that led to the decline of the Roman Empire such as Rome being able to rule almost the whole world being a great power but incapable of ruling itself. Authority was mainly in the hands of the senators that were selected by the Romans; however, there were always internal…show more content…
There was always tension and jealousy between Crassus and Pompey; however, Caesar was always keen on keeping the situation under control in order to keep the triumvirate going. Unfortunately, the situation between Crassus and Pompey got more tensed and the conflicts between them did not come to an end, on the contrary problems grew bigger. Therefore, Caesar had to take action as to put an end to this issue for the sake of the triumvirate's continuation, so he made each of them a consul for a different…show more content…
Succeeding in having all of Gaul under Roman control, Caesar proved himself to be a great ruler and achieved a very high reputation as a strong leader. He was also admired by his army for being ready to sacrifice and go through any hardships and overcome all obstacles for the sake and welfare of Rome. Being favored and admired by the army was one of the main reasons that triggered the senate's fear of his escalating power. However, things began to gradually deteriorate and gravitate towards a civil war. The senate managed to pull Pompey towards them and stimulate tension between him and Caesar; to take things up a notch Crassus died leaving only Pompey and Caesar to each other. Pompey grew more and more jealous and began to encompass the senate's negative attitude towards Caesar which eventually led to the clash of Caesar and Pompey and the end of the First
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