The Capulets In Shakespeare's Romeo And Juliet

530 Words3 Pages
The Capulets and Montagues were not on good terms with each other. Unfortunately though, Romeo and Juliet fell in love with each other regardless if they are from opposing families. Because of these families bad relationship, Romeo and Juliet were forced to marry in secret instead of publicizing it. These two lovers could have been straight-forward to their parents about their marriage, but they choose not to. The Friar is also guilty to these lovers death, but he only thought that this relationship between Romeo and Juliet be the cure to their families grudge for each other. It just happen to be that his plan did not work and the lovers took suicidal action on their own will. Yes, the Friar seems to be more of the culprit, but the cause of making this relationship undergo complication is because of the Capulets and Montagues. Both of them let their anger get ahead of themselves and…show more content…
Go, get thee hence, for I will not away. [Exit Friar Laurence] (5.3.155-160) Friar Laurence is the most to blame as he secretly marries the lovers, he hides Romeo, and he provides Juliet with the sleeping potion; moreover, he leaves the emotionally vulnerable Juliet when he could have forced her out of the tomb with him. His failure to speak with the parents and seek to ameliorate their hatred and his other actions go completely against his religious vows as well as being unconscionable. When Juliet 's father insisted that Juliet marry Paris, she could have been honest and told him why she could not marry Paris; instead, she beats around the bush and asks to delay the marriage instead. Romeo, when he saw Juliet in the tomb, did not have to take the potion. He could have dealt with his grief and tried to move in, which would have given the play and entirely different end because Juliet was not dead. Romeo is such a dramatic love-sick character, however, that it would have been completely out of character for him to live without
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