The Cause Of Destruction In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

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Although both Victor’s and the creation’s actions ultimately bring destruction, it is under society’s injustice that causes these violent and evil intentions, not the individual. Previous to his work, Frankenstein’s studies revolve around “attention was fixed upon every object the most insupportable to the delicacy of the human feelings. I saw how the fine form of man was degraded and wasted” (51). First in obsession with creating life, Frankenstein expresses love towards the supernatural in his passion for natural sciences. Working strenuous hours and putting himself in a weakening state of health, his dedication shows appreciation for his creation, showcasing the capability of love and good in mankind. However, upon the sight of a monster,…show more content…
Why did you form a monster so hideous that even you turned from me in disgust? God, in pity, made man beautiful and alluring, after his own image; but my form is a filthy type of yours, more horrid even from the very resemblance. Satan had his companions, fellow devils, to admire and encourage him, but I am solitary and abhorred” (155). Goodness is all lost when the creature, driven by his desire for revenge, kills those dear to Frankenstein, in which the creation believes will therapeutically heal his personal recounting the pain of the mistreatment over the years. Even in the creation’s acts of kindness towards the family, because of the family’s reaction to the creature, this allows Shelly to reinforce that man is both ‘so virtuous and magnificent’, but also ‘vicious and base’. Thus, inflicting injustice sets the evil of the story in motion, where evil is exacerbated by injustice committed against them, as seen in the case of the creature reacting to his isolation and rejection and Frankenstein in response to the murder of his friends and
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