The Creation Of The Monster In Frankenstein By Mary Shelley

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Frankenstein Frankenstein is the story of Victor Frankenstein and his creation, the monster, written by Mary Shelley. Throughout the story, Frankenstein attempts to achieve greatness and power by using mainly scientific knowledge. He acquires this through exploration and his experiments will later lead him to the outcome of an outright failure of loneliness and devastation. When Mary Shelley wrote Frankenstein, she brought a story that would thrill audiences through the following centuries. Mary Shelley is an English author, born in London and married to the famous poet Percy Bysshe Shelley. Two years into the marriage she published her infamous horror novel about Victor Frankenstein and his monster. She also wrote several other books, including…show more content…
He was thrown into the world looking odd, ugly, being eight feet tall and with the mind of a newborn. Being lonely, he tries to blend in with the society, only to be despised and rejected. I believe that the monster is not purely evil, and I also believe that this is the main message of this book: Evil is not born it is more rather cultivated by ignorance, indifference and isolation. As the story went on I noticed that the monster shows several signs of kindness and sensitivity. For example, he helps a group of poor men and saves a girl from drowning. But although he is doing good things, he gets neglected and met with disgust because of his appearance. This is something that also is characteristic for the romanticism literature; how we feel deep down and how we react to certain things. When Victor Frankenstein created the monster his life plunges into absolute darkness. The monster on the other hand comes into the world with the desire to seek companionship and to connect with people. One of my favorite chapters was when the monster observes the family in the distance. I wouldn´t say that he was stalking them, but he was rather trying to learn their language by listening to them and reading their books. This part of the book has its basis in the age of enlightenment. The idea that there is goodness in every man that can come to the surface under the right…show more content…
I believe that this is what changes the monster throughout the story. In the beginning he was a lot more child-like. He was helpful, kind and sensitive. But as the story went on, he gained knowledge and the more he understood, the more eager was he to seek revenge and kill his creator. Mainly due to the sadness and pain Victor caused by abandoning him. Because after a while the monster realizes that he is on his own, hungry and cold. This turns him into somewhat of a survivor. Everything he picks and observes up during his journey will later on turn him into an evil being because wherever he goes, he gets rejected and
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