The Chicano Movement

1052 Words5 Pages
Large portions of group’s made up by minorities with a wide range of ethnicities started to arise by help of the civil rights movement from the early 1950’s through the 1990’s. These different type of groups advocated for appropriate education, uniform pay rates, to cease racism, and parallel rights for all citizens. The group of minorities brought attention to their problematic issues by participating in marches, protest and boycotts. For example, during March 1968 in East Los Angeles Chicano students protested for suitable educational facilities, the deficiencies in proper school supplies, and curriculum change to include Chicano history and culture. Another instance on how groups formulated by minorities obtained the public attention for…show more content…
The Chicano encountered a great deal of opposition with advocating for their movement, including internal conflict by the cause of infiltrators in the Chicano organizations. For instances, the Chicano movement from 1968-1971 in Los Angeles received massive attacks both physically and socially by the Los Angeles police department (LAPD). Such attacks consisted of the LAPD harassing, intimidating, and arresting individuals by using unnecessary force. To illustrate, in early March of 1970, students at Roosevelt High School located in East Los Angeles participated in a walkout to protest the educational policies. The LAPD reacted to the student walkout by using force to end the protest. Police officers began to beat protestors with nightsticks and drag high school girls by their hair across the school campus. The LAPD also participate in discrediting Chicano organizations by red-baiting which consisted of labeling Chicano organization as a form of…show more content…
Difficulties confronted by women during the civil rights movement consisted of the problematic issue of equivalent of leadership roles and balanced distribution of rights. Notably, African American women advocating for human rights confronted enmity with their male counterparts over management of their civil rights organizations. For instance, a majority of African American women acted as bridge leaders for their organizations. Bridge leaders operated as helpers aiding their social movement by informing communities about the motives such as, equal pay rate and educational environment. These Bridge leaders provide leadership as well as new followers. Although African women participated as officers and bridge leaders for their organizations, they had been marginalized to small roles or as informal leaders. Rarely did African American women operated the hierarchy of their movement. For example, members from MIA (Montgomery Improvement Association) organization like, Johnnie Carr agreed that women would not be able to be elected as president of the organization, but did have the option to become
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