The Wolf In 'The Three Little Pigs'

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In “The 3 Little Pigs”, the wolf, along with all the pigs, are all personified and hold human-like ways of thinking and acting. In this story, the wolf is a clearly thought out individual, capable of making his own decisions, where his actions are simply evil due to being a monstrous character used to teach a lesson to the target audience (children). As proven by sources A, C, and D, the normality of the behaviors exhibited by the wolf is not excused, nor relevant to the moral of “The 3 Little Pigs”, being a children’s tale where the wolf if depicted as a villainous character, with a human-like moral compass, regardless of his species. In the preponderance of fairy tales used to serve lessons or morals to children, “The…show more content…
The wolf “who dearly loved to eat fat little piggies” (Source A) successfully broke into the homes of two pigs, and attempted to blow in the third pig’s home, where he met his fate. Even if we were to excuse the wolf’s foul behavior due to his natural instincts, three separate incidents in the same day is not only reprehensible, but is additionally unnecessary for his diet. From the amount of innocent pigs the wolf ate prior to the last invasion and the threats he delivered, it can be concluded that the wolf enjoyed terrorizing the pigs, and it was never about feeding himself in the first place. After eating the youngest and most naive pigs, the wolf attempted to continue on with finishing off the siblings by blowing in the last home, made of brick. While this was insufficient, being that the house was substantial and durable, “the wolf was a sly old wolf” (Source A), and he did not stop there. He continued to find a path inside and “he climbed up on the roof to look for a way into the brick house” (Source A). This obviously goes much further than animal instincts, considering the wolf had to have premeditated the murder to consider the intrucut route he ultimately chose to follow. Anyone, including children, can recognize the bad intentions the wolf had, that went much further than simply looking for food as a wild animal. In brief, in the tale of “The 3 Little Pigs”, the wolf is
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