The Civil Rights Movement: Brown Vs. Board Of Education

698 Words3 Pages
"We may have all come on different ships, but we’re in the same boat now” (Martin Luther King, Jr.). Before the Civil Rights Movement was commenced, segregation was challenged in many different instances, including the many court cases. Some of the cases were considered fair and not unlawful, however others had a conclusion of segregation that went against the fourteenth amendment, which was only the start of realization for the Civil Rights Movement. These three civil court cases influenced the Civil Rights Movement by giving more reason and proof of why desegregation needed to be enacted: Shelley v. Kraemer, Brown v. Board of Education, Loving v. Virginia. One important case that contributed to the Civil Rights Movement was the case…show more content…
Board of Education case. This case began because a little girl, Linda Brown, had to walk to the African American school, several blocks further from her home even though the school for white children was much closer. The Board of Education was ignorant and would not allow Linda to enroll into the closer school, the school for whites only. Furthermore, the Browns sued the Board of Education. As a result, the court decided that "state-sanctioned segregation of public schools was a violation of the 14th amendment and was therefore unconstitutional" (Brown v. Board of Education). The importance of this case demonstrates that segregating public schools is unlawful and children have the right to go to the school they…show more content…
These three civil court cases were not the only experiences that influenced the Civil Rights Movement, yet they were important because they were giving more reasons and proof of why desegregation needed to be enacted: Shelley v. Kraemer, Brown v. Board of Education, Loving v. Virginia. White people do not have the right to decide whether African Americans are allowed to live in their neighborhood, as shown in the case Shelley v. Kraemer. Also, white people are not allowed to segregate certain schools so that African Americans can not go to them or decide that African Americans can not marry white people, such as in the cases Brown v. Board of Education and Loving v. Virginia. All of these cases are supported by the 14th amendment, which guarantees that all people are equal. “This nation was founded by men of many nations and backgrounds. It was founded on the principle that all men are created equal, and that the rights of every man are diminished when the rights of one man are threatened … It ought to to be possible, in short, for every American to enjoy the privileges of being American without regard to his race or his color" (John F.
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