The Connotation Of Love In Shakespeare's Romeo And Juliet

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Some might say Romeo & Juliet is the greatest tragedy while others believe it’s the greatest love story, but the author William Shakespeare saw it as so much more. Shakespeare’s work conveys his connotation with love as positive because throughout the story the two lovers worry about the other more than themselves, they would rather be damned to eternal hell than walk the earth without the other, and they show deep grief when the other of the two is thought to be gone. Romeo & Juliet are two headstrong teenagers but they also care deeply about one another as they worry about the other much more than their own well-being. The feelings they have for one another is obvious as they rush into their relationship, but they show pure feelings as…show more content…
As the story between the lovers progress their love blossoms and becomes part of them "If in thy wisdom, thou canst give no help, do thou but call my resolution wise, and with this knife I’ll help it presently” (IV.i.53-55). As Juliet says this to the Friar, she feels as though it’s the only solution without Romeo because he makes it worth her while to wake up every day, which conveys Shakespeare’s true feelings about love as in other ways this can be seen as though without each other they aren’t whole. Shakespeare’s subtle hints of positive love is revealed in numerous areas of the story, even if it’s through sadistic ways "Romeo, Romeo, Romeo! Here’s drink. I drink to thee." (IV.iii.59). While Juliet drinks the potion which the Friar made for her she says it’s for Romeo, he’s her motivation to go through with this despite her fears because she would rather be dead than lose Romeo. Which demonstrates Shakespeare’s connotation with love as positive because she couldn’t handle life without her true love. The revealing of the two lovers demented thoughts of death continue upon in the story, becoming additionally more dark "Come hither, man. I see that thou art poor. Hold, there is forty ducats. Let me have A dram of poison, such soon-speeding gear as will disperse itself through all the veins that the life-weary…show more content…
When Romeo first heard news of Juliet’s “death” he was upset with the world for taking his true love away from him too soon “Then I defy you, stars” (V.i.24). In those words, Romeo is screaming at the world for taking his will to live, as shortly after he went to get fatal poisoning so he could join his fair Juliet. Though the tragedy of their love doesn’t stop there as the expiry ending has just began with that phrase “the yoke of inauspicious stars from this world-wearied flesh” (V.iii.120-121). These are Romeos last word as he bestows a kiss onto Juliet’s lips before the poison takes him. With Romeo’s death occurring minutes before Juliet’s awakening she was torn when she awoke to find him “O happy dagger, this is thy sheath, there rust and let me die.” (V.iii.182-183). This phrase is the last one to leave Juliet’s lips as she stabs herself to be reunited with Romeo. Both of the two lovers were so grief-stricken with the loss of the other that they both ended up dead in the
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