The Consequences Of Death In John Steinbeck's Of Mice And Men

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When it comes to death it is better to have a peaceful one rather than a harsh death. In the story Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck, George is put in the middle of a desperate situation forcing him to kill his best friend in an act of mercy. After constantly saving Lennie from getting into trouble, it becomes clear that George has the best interest in Lennie. He wants Lennie to become aware of his actions, and maybe one day not be so dependent on someone to keep him out of trouble. George's actions are justified as it was better for a friend to kill Lennie unexpectedly rather than a cruel manner by Curley and his men.

Since Lennie has a mental disability he is unaware of the situations he gets himself into. He does not realize the amount of strength he has nor the consequences of his actions. Lennie is always attracted to petting soft things such as mice or puppies. Due to his touch being so heavy, he often kills the animals on accident. When in the ranch he even killed the puppy he had that Slim gave to him on accident. In order to save Lennie from harsh consequences, George would always help Lennie by attempting to make him aware that his actions cause damage. Lennie’s killing of small animals foreshadows the incident that occurs in the ranch as the power of his strength is shown.
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“Jus’ wanted to feel that girls dress..”(Ch. 1) Lennie found himself attracted to a girls dress, as he just wanted to feel how soft her dress really was. But immediately the girl pulls away, feeling harassed and scared. Lennie, unaware of what is occurring keeps holding on as if she were a mouse. In order to save Lennie from being attacked, George makes them both escape from the town. Georges attempts to keep Lennie are almost impossible since he is constantly having to correct Lennie’s mistakes. Leading to their arrival at the
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