The Consequences Of Globalization

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Globalization Globalization hovers over substantial fields yet remains an elusive subject because it's not necessarily unidirectional or rigid in effect across fields. Globalization is defined by Giddens as “The intensification of world-wide social relations which link distant localities in such a way that local happenings are shaped by events occurring many miles away and vice versa” (Giddens 1990: 63-64). Held certifies this ‘intensification’ as a result of more tangible dimensions such as extensity, vigour, pace and impact. (Held 1999: 14-15) Steger widens your scope yet further by means of encompassing disciplines affected by globalization such as economic, political, cultural, ecological, and ideological (Steger 2009: 11). The challenge…show more content…
Giddens observes, “Consequences of modernity are becoming more radicalized and universalized than before” (Giddens 1990: 3). He implies that globalization is now radicalized and universalized congruently but there are also plenty of instances when these forces are observed to collide against each other. Kaldor rightly says that “The term globalization conceals a complex process which actually involves globalization and localization, integration and fragmentation, homogenization and differentiation” (Kaldor 2001: 71). The Convergence Theory and also the Global Chaos Theory highlight this dichotomy. Convergence Theory asserts that with globalization, distinct systems will become more alike, whilst Global Chaos Theory is saying that globalization imposes a sort of convergence of values, even an imposition of western values, which the ‘rest’ of the world retaliates against…show more content…
Advocates of this camp would probably concede that globalization is exacerbating ethnic conflicts. Politically-speaking, Khor maintains that globalization is what, Third World referred to for many centuries as colonization (Alison 2012). Financially speaking, Gill condemns globalization for “Intensification of alienation, exploitation along with commodification of individual life and nature” (Alison 2012). Both Khor and Gill point out that globalization is an instrument steered by the Western hegemons to spread capitalistic and democratic
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