The Contribution Of Benjamin Franklin's Journey To America

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Benjamin Franklin was born January 17. Born in Boston, the youngest son of Josiah and Abiah Franklin. At the young age of 11 in 1717 he made his first invention. Benjamin started apprenticing for his brother’s print shop in 1718. He soon became tiered of his brother’s abuse causing him to run away from his home New England in 1723 to start a print shop in New York
He failed to set up a shop and walked to Pennsylvania where he would become homeless and run out of money. He soon after found a job as an apprentice printer. Franklin was doing so well that the governor of Pennsylvania promised to setup a print shop for him if Franklin traveled to England to buy fonts and printing equipment. Upon traveling to London and buying the equipment the governor abolished his promise and Benjamin was stuck in England for several months. Before traveling to London Benjamin had been living with the Read family. Deborah Read, his lover, was talking
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Benjamin did not only print the Pennsylvania Gazette he also contributed pieces under various aliases. The Pennsylvania Gazette soon became the most popular newspaper in all the colonies and printed the first political cartoon made by Benjamin himself. During the 1720’s and 30’s Benjamin Franklin was very social organizing Junto and joining the Masons. Franklin, in 1733, began publishing poor Richards’ almanac and many of his now famous quotes came from his alias Richard Saunders, such as "A penny saved is a penny earned" actually came from the almanac.
Paragraph two- Inventions [Not Finished] The later in his life Benjamin was the more he tried to fix fundamental flaws in society. This would also be his most influential time helping American succeed in a revolution. Through out the 1730’s and 1740’s Benjamin Franklin saw that people were not able to afford the scarce books delivered form England. Thus he and some fellow contributors pooled their resources and created the first subscription library. Soon
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