The Crucible Conscience Analysis

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The Crucible is a plot about the 1692 Salem Witch Trials written by playwrighter Arthur Miller in 1953. The play greatly demonstrates the importance of the individual conscience and is well known for its historically accurate, yet fictionalized content. It takes place in 1692, colonial Massachusetts. The Crucible depicts many issues that the citizens in Salem had to face. Every character had a motivation to accuse one another of witchcraft. Whether it was greed, jealousy, lust, revenge or saving their own lives, almost every accused person was innocent.

John Proctor was one of the many innocent accused of witchcraft. Proctor was accused by Mary Warren, a girl that was involved in the conjuring ritual that caused this tragedy.
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No matter what her consequence is she will refuse admitting to witchcraft. Nurse is a religiously devout woman in her seventies. Nurse’s reputation in all of Salem was so clear, that even John Hale (also known as Reverend Hale) was confused. Nurse states: “If so he is, then let us go to God for the cause of it. There is prodigious danger in the seeking of loose spirits. I fear it, I fear it. Let us rather blame ourselves and—”. Rebecca Nurse is suggesting that the court investigates themselves rather than blaming the situation on supernatural powers. This was a direct suggestion towards Ann Putnam, who is looking for vengance on Nurse for “killing” her babies with black magic. Rebecca Nurse states: “No, you cannot break charity with your minister. You are another kind, John. Clasp his hand, make your peace”. This is said towards John Proctor to avoid another altercation between him and Parris. Nurse is stating that everyone should stay true to their religion, but John is not close to the church. Nurse wants John to pray and find some sort of peace because she does not like violence. Rebecca Nurse is seen as an example of strength and resolve in the community of Salem. She takes her consequence with dignity, peace and ease, which makes her a saint after her
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