The Declaration Of Sentiments: The Women's Suffrage Movement

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The 1840s was the beginning of many reforms towards society. The Second Great Awakening created various religions based on the belief on how a person should live their lives. This lead to the Antebellum Era, the beginning of the revival in America. According to Newman and Schmalbach in their textbook, Unites States History Preparing for the Advanced Placement Examination: women began the anti-slavery reforms during the Antebellum Era. Women wanted equality between sexes because the fourteenth amendment gave all white males the right to vote.Stanton held the women 's convention in 1848, to discuss the violation of equality toward woman in anti-slavery political debates. Elizabeth Cady Stanton wrote the Declaration of Sentiments in the Methodist Church in Seneca Falls, New York, that began the women 's suffrage movement. The Declaration of Sentiments is modeled after the Declaration of Thomas Jefferson to emphasize the political, economical, and legal wrongs done towards women. In her document, The Declaration of Sentiments, Elizabeth Cady Stanton portrays the barriers that limited women 's rights and the violation of equality towards women. Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s document , The…show more content…
In her document, The Declaration of Sentiments, demonstrates the political and legal right violated in the 1840s. Stanton conveyed the violation against equality toward woman, “After depriving her all rights as a married woman, if single, and the owner of property, he has taxed her to support a government which recognizes her only when her property can be made profitable to it”(Stanton). The Declaration of Sentiments reflected the violation of political and legal rights which men endorse over a women. During the women 's suffrage, men made a woman support a government in which she had no voice in. A woman could not vote, be in political discussion or own property. A woman during the 1840s did not have the political and legal rights the Declaration of Independence
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