The Destruction Of Emotions In August Wilson's Fences

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August Wilson is an award winning American playwright who portrays the African-American experience through ten plays. Throughout his play, Fences, he demonstrates a man, Troy, who is strongly opinionated. He is more concerned with his own feelings instead of others. He prevents his son from playing college football, cheats on his wife, and places his brother in a mental hospital. He does it all because it is best for himself. Rose, his wife, is the one who holds the family together through the toughest times. She defends her family, and cares for another woman’s child. Cory, Troy’s son, attempts to be like his father while growing up; however, he soon realizes he is mistaken. He eventually turns out to be nothing like his father. While Rose and Cory emotionally progress throughout the play, Troy emotionally declines. Troy’s own feelings and concerns are the most important concern of his. For example, the relationship between Troy and Alberta, Troy’s mistress. Troy and Bono discuss Alberta and her appearance, Troy says, “It’s the truth! Like you riding on Goodyears” (1.1.75). Rather than worrying about Rose, he brags about how much pleasure Alberta brings him. Rose’s feelings…show more content…
Troy is concerned with his own feelings instead of others. He assumes he is right in every situation, consequently, he loses his family. Furthermore, Rose defends herself and her family. Although Troy desperately attempts to control her she does not allow it. She supports Cory during the football recruitment. Also, she raises Alberta’s child. She is the one who keeps the family together. Moreover, Cory spends his whole life trying to be like his father until he starts trying to be himself. After his father ruined his chances to go to college and play football, he still manages to become successful in life. In conclusion, Rose and Cory both grow emotionally; however, Troy tends to be the same throughout the

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