Custer's Battlefield: The Battle Of Little Bighorn

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As late as the nineteenth century, Native American relations with the Anglo-Americans remained full of unease and hostility. The desire to expand the U.S. coast-to-coast known as Manifest Destiny inspired many to travel west to seek new opportunities and land. However, although the U.S. grew and successfully established a transcontinental railroad, Native Americans regressed under the developing America. As a result, Native Americans attempted to backlash with events like the Battle of Little Bighorn where efforts to preserve Native American culture were short-lasting. From social factors such as the assimilation of natives to economic factors such as taking land forcefully, tensions between Native Americans and Anglo-Americans persisted. Similarly,…show more content…
For example, Document 14.2, Description of Custer’s Battlefield (1876) by General Philip Sheridan, talks about Custer’s battle against the Cheyenne and Sioux indians in Battle of Little Bighorn. The battle started when the U.S. army chose to ignore all previous treaties and invade the native American lands in search of gold. In response to the betrayal, the Sioux and Cheyenne indians joined forces and outnumbered Custer’s army. Nevertheless, choosing to ignore all previous treaties with Indians caused distrust between Americans and Natives Americans. The action of trying to constantly take land from the natives was a factor that led to the hostile relationship between the Americans and Natives. Additionally, another economic factor was the creation of the Homestead Act of 1862 that would continue playing a role of stripping the natives of their home land. The Homestead Act granted 160 acres of land for anyone willing to settle out west and develop the land. Again, the Americans were taking land that wasn’t theirs and giving it away like it was theirs. As a result of having their home land being taken away, this angered the Natives and reinforced the hostility they had against the Americans. The selfishness of the Americans lead to the tense relationship with the…show more content…
From years of Americans taking Native Americans land and excluding them of rights, there’s no wonder why the two never got along. Even when the Americans were more accepting by “giving” them their land back and “educating” them, the Natives always got the short end of the
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