The Effects Of Benjamin Franklin's Abolishment Of Slavery

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I am happy to hear that you and William are finally settled in your new home. I am however, saddened to hear of the discord between William and his father, and how it has upset your household. I can understand Willian’s frustration. There was a time Benjamin Franklin demonstrated allegiance to the British crown. When the French and Indian War broke out, Franklin was able to secure horses, wagons, and supplies for the British General Edward Braddock by pledging his own credit to the Pennsylvania farmers, who then agreed to provide the necessary equipment. It seems Dr. Franklin’s feelings for the crown began to turn sour sometime in 1766 when he was brought before the House of Commons to discuss the effects of the Stamp Act on the colonies. In the end the act was repealed, but then Parliament started introducing new taxes on the colonies which but a great strain on Dr. Franklin’s devotion to Great Britain (Funk & Wagnalls New World Encyclopedia database).…show more content…
The fits have subsided, but alas are not completely gone. I guess we all have our burdens to bare. As for the Dutch Quakers, they continue to concentrate on the abolishment of slavery. They have even taken steps to remove members from leadership roles who were found holding, buying or selling slaves (History of the Society of Friends in America, pg 245) Abolishment of slavery is quite the uphill battle, but they seemed more determined than ever to see it
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