The Effects Of Isolation In Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

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“Satan had his companions, fellow devils, to admire and encourage him, but I am solitary and abhorred” (140). Mary Shelley’s novel, Frankenstein, follows the adventures of Victor Frankenstein, a young scientist who desires to unearth the hidden mysteries that lie in the grey area between life and death, and the consequence of his lust- a lonely monster. Shelley eloquently depicts the destructive effects of loneliness in her novel through the use of Romantic descriptions and multiple narrations and proves thus: Isolation breeds conflicts within man’s moral responsibilities. Being secluded from society results in an obsession for power, a development of a corrupt demeanor, and lastly, a need to impose vengeance. Isolation provokes man to develop…show more content…
The creature is alone because no one else is as repulsive and wretched as he is which sparks an idea that he believes is brilliant- Victor needs to make a female creature with equally horrid features so that she and the monster could love each other because they would have no one else. “I am alone and miserable… but one as deformed and horrible as myself would not deny herself to me” (155). Victor is reluctant at first, but out of sympathy he agrees to the creature’s request. While creating the female creature, Victor endures overwhelming amounts of guilt and anxiety. The further he dedicates himself to this new production, the more skeptical he becomes about whether this creation will finally bring peace to him, the people around him, and future generations. As a spur of the moment decision, Frankenstein does not just fracture his work, but mutilates it right in front of the monster’s eyes. To see his last hope of finally achieving happiness, in a society that could never accept him, be demolished by the same person who denied him from pleasure since the beginning of his life span, devastated the creature. “‘Shall each man… find a wife for his bosom and each beast have his mate, and I be alone? I had feelings of affection and they were requited by detestation and scorn… Are you to be happy while I grovel in the intensity of my wretchedness?” (182). Rage and violence devours the creature to an excessive extent. His…show more content…
A blind passion for power, a dangerous nature, and a compulsive thirst to seek revenge can all be commenced by severe loneliness. It becomes evident that withdrawal from human society is the grimmest kind of fate for anyone to suffer through. Without a doubt, the true monster in Frankenstein is neither Victor, nor the creature, but the powerful immorality that is
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