The English Language As An International Language

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The English language is considered an international language. It is the language used for international communication and speakers need to be able to exchange information effectively, both orally and in writing (Di Laurea, 2004). It is also the language of trade and industry, and of science and technology. Most of the transactions in business are done in English. A tremendous number of people worldwide have been studying English to increase their opportunities for professional success (Diamond, 2017). Consequently, English is widely used around the world - not just in countries which it is a native language but in many other countries in which it is either a second language or a foreign language. In addition, anyone wishing to fly a commercial…show more content…
Thus, having a good knowledge of the English language can take people to places they have never been before. Being one of the touchstones of communication, speaking affects the quality of how people communicate with each other to a great extent (Saka, 2015). Moreover, most people find steady jobs and self-advancement if they are good in English. Good English, not only entails good grammar and rich vocabulary but it also demands good accent and pronunciation. Social interaction can be significantly impeded if a person has poor pronunciation skill. This person is likely to face difficulties in getting through to native speakers. While poor pronunciation is not necessarily equated to mediocrity, a good pronunciation is unconsciously considered by the listener as a fair indication of mental and physical alertness (Mata & Soriano, 1998). In addition, an incomprehensible may cause misunderstanding, in interpreting the utterance since the words are not recognizable. Therefore, clear pronunciation is essential in vocabulary and grammar. They are more likely to communicate effectively when they have good pronunciation and intonation according to Burns in Sudrajat…show more content…
The first group consisted of foreign teaching assistants – and sometimes foreign faculty – in colleges and universities in English speaking countries; second group is comprised of foreign-born technical, business, and professional employees in business and industry in English-speaking countries; international business people and diplomats who need to use English as their working lingua franca belong to the last group, and the last group consists of refugees (adult and adolescent) in resettlement and vocational training programs wishing to relocate in English-speaking countries. In addition to these four categories, Celce-Murcia et al. (2000) added two more groups. Teachers of English as a foreign language who are not native speakers of English and who expect to serve as the major model and source of input in English for their students is the first group, and the people in non-English speaking countries working as tour guides, waiters, hotel personnel, customs agents, and the like, who use English for dealing with visitors who do not speak their
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