The Ethics Of Eating Meat

1091 Words5 Pages
In the paper I recently wrote, I argued that eating meat is ethically sound as long as it is with careful consideration and direct exceptions, and that it was the most ethical approach to consuming animals. When considering eating other creatures it is advised that we pay more attention than just focusing on the actual act of consuming and bring into account the lives of those animals as well as the environmental impacts caused by that animal’s life and death. Causing suffering in others is an action punishable by law and one most people would consider the height of immoral behavior, and yet our food is infested with the actions. By removing the agony and uncomfortableness from the lifetimes and preparations of our food we would be making our…show more content…
We are still killing them for food, of course, so strict vegetarians and vegans could argue that this approach to the current meat system is not much different than what we are already performing. By still killing and eating animals we are ending their lives prematurely for our own food resources, which to vegetarians and vegans would find less than satisfactory as they do not eat meat to live. Those that feast on beef on an overly regular basis will find fault in my proposed ethical system due to the fact that it requires that all cows be removed from the situation as they have the harshest environmental impact of all commonly eaten animals. Being forced to give up a beloved food source would be difficult to ask this group of the population. The farmers themselves would also stand to discredit my proposition as it would cause untold damages to their livelihoods in exchange for giving up beef and industrial farming. As that is their major export it would be a difficult journey to attempt to convince them to give up their cattle, as well as the efficiency they claim with their tightly packed, stress-infused practices. On the other side of the industry, the consumers themselves, might also find fault with this assertion as it would be difficult to actually verify the changes had taken place completely. The food industry has made an art out of wordplay and has used it to the…show more content…
From the start humans have been omnivores, meaning they eat both meat and vegetables on a regular basis for survival, and as we have developed over time the amount of meat that is eaten each year has done nothing but grow. Our tastes have turned towards the meats we can now produce in large quantities, and as my brother would claim, “plants taste like dirt”. That is a reasonable claim, as forcing ourselves to consume foods that our tastes just do not like is an uncomfortable experience, and as a blatantly social action we should enjoy what we eat. We’ve reached a point in our society, within the United States at least, where the majority of the population can focus more on the taste of our foods beyond simply being able to acquire it, something industrial farming has made much easier. Meat, it turns out, is delicious and the center performer of quite a number of dishes, beef especially. Every burger place boasts large quantities of beef in their options, and with how numerous successful burger joints are throughout the country we are just eating it
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