The First Amendment: The Freedom Of Speech

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The First Amendment is the first section of the Bill of Rights and is considered the most important part of the U.S Constitution because it offers the citizens of United States the essential human freedoms of religion, freedom of speech, press, peaceful assembly and the freedom to petition the Government. The first amendment rights are not provided by the government, indeed these are the rights that people inherently possess. This amendment is not only an important amendment but also a controversial amendment in Bill of Rights. Specifically, this piece of writing explains freedom of religion and the freedom of speech below. The First Amendment of the United States was offered to the states for ratification on September…show more content…
Freedom of religion has two parts and both of them create a separate religious liberty of freedom. The first part, “no law respecting an establishment of religion” is caused the establishment clause. The second clause is “free exercise of religion”. Establishment of religion means that the United States of America cannot create an official state church; as an example, like the church of England. This means, that the first amendment ensures that the United States does not have state endorsed religion, nor does it write its laws based on religious edicts. This clause in the constitution deals with religious monuments and school prayers. It also forbids the government from preferring religion over non-religion or non religion over religion. Furthermore, the free exercise clause in a way is more straightforward; which means, that one cannot pay for exercise. Simply, it means that one cannot be prohibited from being part of a certain religion, although it does not mean that any religious practice is…show more content…
The first amendment free speech rights are not absolute. Freedom of speech includes the right which protected and simultaneously, the rights that are not protected. The rights which are protected such as right not to speak (1943), the right of students – to wear black armbands to school to protest a war (1969), to use certain offensive words and phrases to convey political messages (1971), to contribute money (1976), to advertise commercial products and professional services (1977), and to engage in symbolic speeches (1990). In the other hand, the rights which are not actually protected in free speech contains; inciting actions that would harm others (1919), making or distributing obscene materials (1957), bumming draft cards as an anti-war protest (1967), permitting students to print articles in a school newspaper over the objections of the school administration, of students to make an obscene speech at school-sponsored event and of students, to advocate illegal drug use at a school-sponsored event. To sum up, the first amendment of the United States of America is the most significant amendment to the maintenance of a democratic government since it states important issues like freedom of religion, freedom of speech, press, peaceful assembly and the freedom to petition the government. As discussed; the freedom
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