Theme Of Aggression In Emily Dickinson's Poetry

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3.2 The Form of Aggression in Emily Dickinson and Sylvia Plath’s Selected Poems Both Emily Dickinson and Sylvia Plath have an immense part in their unconsciousness that recognize the death instinct urge as seen from their work especially most of their poem. Death instinct and aggression have a tight connection that is undeniable. Aggression is the real output of death instinct urge occurs when death instinct appears and dominates in human unconsciousness. As previously stated in the first chapter of this thesis, the atmosphere of their literary work often about death, suffering, loss, anxiety, unfaithfulness, loneliness, rebellion and another negative impulse that lead to aggression. Quoting from the second chapter, aggression can be said…show more content…
“Held fast in everlasting race/ By my own choice and thee. /Good-by to the life I used to live, / And the world I used to know;/ Now I am ready to go!” (L11. 12. 13. 14. And 16). The existence of the God (Thee) in this poem assumes that the speaker is a religious person. Even though the speaker wishes for her death but still the speaker wisely hope God will take her sooner. This poem does not show the idea of aggressive behavior that the speaker does in her life. The aggression just comes up in the speaker mind without any action as well. The speaker is able to control her desire for death in her…show more content…
In this poem, Dickinson shows the idea of separation by death in human life and the consequences that come up following by death to people who left. A third event to me,/ So huge, so hopeless to conceive,(L. 4-5) The speaker feels disappointed toward death because death makes her apart from her friends or relatives. The anger reaction that the speaker expressed drives toward aggression but not result in aggressive acts. The aggressiveness just comes up in her mind as the feeling of upset. There are no actual acts of aggression that brings to destruction in this poem. The speaker feeling of mourns or despair which left by acquaintance is the one feeling that Dickinson’s
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