The Four Stages Of Project Management

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A project manager is a person who is responsible for planning, implementing and completely a project according to the project’s given deadline and within the project 's budget. The four stages of being a project manager are: Project Initiation, Project Planning, Project Execution and Project Closedown. The project manager must have a wide variation of skills including the ability to ask questions and resolve conflict occurring between individuals, they must also have methodical management skills. The project manager is responsible for making decisions, whether they are large or small. They must be able to control the risks associated with their projects while also minimising uncertainty. Every decision the project manager makes is vital to the…show more content…
It falls on the project manager to be the one to resolve the conflict, in such a way that it does not lead to a loss. Effective project management begins with selecting and prioritizing projects that support the firms strategy and mission. Project managers have to plan and budget projects as well as orchestrate the contributions of others. Social-skills, decision making skills and problem handling skills, communication, flexibility, leadership are some of the many skills that a project manager must have in order to have a successful project. Projects are inherently uncertain and face unexpected events, from small changes to unforeseen changes like conflicts within organization, with clients and resources etc. The project manager is the middle man between top management and the other employees within the organization and therefore it is their responsibility to maintain a good balance between both. Conflict is not always destructive but can also be constructive and beneficial to an organization. It can help to develop individuals and improve an organisation. Conflict can highlight underlying issues, and force people to confront possible problems in a solution. Constructive conflict occurs when people change and grow personally from the conflict, involvement of the individuals affected by the conflict is increased, cohesiveness is formed among team members, and a solution to the problem is found. If the conflict is…show more content…
“It’s the manner in which managers manage people that separates the ordinary from the good and the exceptional” (Mowbray). Good relationships are based on trust, commitment and engagement, a good manager’s main role is to build strong relationships with his or her staff for the benefit of the organisation, so that the tasks that are provided are completed effectively, efficiently and enthusiastically. Peter Drucker says that a good manager is the “dynamic, life-giving element in every business” (Drucker,1954). Effective management requires coordination of analytical administrative and organisational skills, in order to “make a productive enterprise out of human and material resources” (Drucker, 1954). These skills are not enough to make a good manager, the main element is the manager’s ability to deal with the people in the organisation. The answer to the question ‘What makes a good manager?’ relies on the employee. The research company Gallup suggests that good management-staff relationships rest on four foundations. “Employees would like: Managers who show care, interest and concern for their staff, to know what is expected of them, a role which fits their abilities, positive feedback and recognition regularly for work well done”(Martin,
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