The Fourth Amendment

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The Fourth Amendment affirms that "people are secure against unreasonable searches and seizures, no Warrants shall issue, describe the place to search, and the persons or things to be seized." There should be a warrant for everything if what a person is being charged for is risking their rights as a U.S citizen. For example the privacy of a citizen is safe under the Fourth Amendment. Second, the property belonging to U.S citizens is secure from search and seizure without a warrant. Third, due to the Fourth Amendment, any citizen is safe from unfair arrests. Even though warrants help citizens they also make it more difficult for detectives and they make it difficult for government to collect evidence to use it against someone who actually commits…show more content…
For instance, when abandoned property is seized without a warrant, it does not break any of the rules of the Fourth Amendment and it does not violate the Fourth Amendment (Strasser 1). Meaning, if items are deserted they can be seized under government custody without authorization. In addition, an object seized in plain sight without a warrant does not represent seizures and does not define seizures based upon the Fourth Amendment. Strasser identifies that if an object is seized in clear vision it is not considered a seizure. Warrantless searches or seizures of private properties are typically illegal unless there are justified exceptions (Strasser 1). Therefore, the only way a search and seizure of a citizens’ private property is legal is with a reasonable exception. Furthermore, the Fourth Amendment keeps the belongings of American people secure from warrantless searches and…show more content…
For example, in certain circumstances where a police officer has a legible belief that a suspect has perpetrated a crime, or if a suspect is a threat to public security a warrantless arrest may be valid (Strasser 1). Meaning, if a police officer has a good reason to believe a suspect has done something illegal, and if they arrest the suspect without a warrant it might be okay. According to Strasser, “A warrantless arrest may be justified where probable cause and urgent need are present prior to the arrest” (1). Therefore, a warrantless arrest might be validated where likely cause and imperative need are present previous to the arrest. An arrest without a warrant may be disregarded, if the police officer fails to demonstrate vital circumstances (Strasser 1). Signifying, if an officer cannot prove important situations the arrest of someone may be canceled. As a result of the Fourth Amendment, U.S citizens are protected from unfair or unwanted
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