Reasons Behind The English Revolution Essay

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The Reasons behind the English Revolution
The English revolution or known as the English Civil War was a period of armed conflict and political agitation from 1642 until 1649. It witnessed the trial of the king Charles I in who reigned since 1625. During his sovereignty, England saw a clear division between the royalists and the Parliamentarians. Indeed, this period witnessed great turmoil and caused the suffering of the English people and brought with it many changes. This struggle was inevitable due to the King’s selfish way of ruling and the terrible consequences of his decisions and of his acts. It was the most significant event in the early English history. Hence, in this essay, I will examine the most important
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Yet, for them, it was the perfect opportunity to be heard. Indeed, they made a document called the Grand Remonstrance, a list of complains citing Charles’ faults such as the raised taxes and the changes that were made in the church (Boston and Philadelphia 80). Hence, in order to improve the state of the country, the Parliamentarians asked for more power and to reduce the role the king. They attested that Charles I was easily influenced by those who surrounded him, especially his advisor (Danver 115). Hence, they emphasized the necessity to put an end to the king’s personal rule. Charles I, being helpless and under pressure, had no choice but to accept the conditions. The best example of that is the demolition of the Star Chamber and the agreement on the fact that Parliament should be consulted once every three years (Child and Shuter 54).
By doing so, the Parliament wanted England to be more secure and to avoid its downfall. Hence, it did not hesitate to place a bill of Attainder against anyone who was considered as a traitor (Coates, Young, and Snow 421), notably against Laud. Strafford was another victim of this new rule as he was executed; an act which would appear as being destructive to the balance of England (Sauer
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