The Great Gatsby And The Godfather Analysis

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.America is the land of opportunity to many individuals. It gives people a chance to become who they really desire to be. That idea though, is not always true. What sometimes occurs is that people who want to become a true American make themselves believe that the only way to do so is by becoming powerful and losing the morals that they were taught. What has been ingrained in much of society is that if one does not do one of those things they are lesser than the ones who do. These types of people are seen as outcasts and since they want to be accepted they change who they are. In the novel, The Great Gatsby, and the movie, The Godfather, each main character starts off their lives as respectable and honorable individuals. In the end though,…show more content…
This ideas roots itself in disenfranchisement and how people judge other people just on how much success they have had. When Gatsby was young he felt like he did not fit with the social class that he was raised in. He wanted to get out of it because he believed that was the only way to be achieve his determined destiny. As he was growing up Gatsby, “was a son of God-a phrase which, if it means anything, means just that-and he must be about His Father’s Business, the service of a vast, vulgar and meretricious beauty” (Fitzgerald 104). Gatsby believed that he was meant to get out of his current circumstance because it was his destiny. Gatsby even talks about how, “His parents were shiftless and unsuccessful farm people-his imagination had never really accepted them as his parents at all” (Fitzgerald 104). Throughout all of his young years he felt as though the world was calling to him to become something more. That passion led Gatsby to believing the only way to “free” himself from those “constraints” was by going out into society and becoming a part of the American dream. When he competed his destiny of becoming successful he had not realized how much the journey had taken away his morals and passion that had been present in his younger years. As became his version of an American he lost his ability to have that passion and in the end of…show more content…
For Gatsby it was his passion to keep achieving more. When he became rich he just let anyone into his home to make himself feel like his success was brought him something, but at the same time he did not talk to any of them. The truth was though, that Gatsby held parties not to share his success or even to be around people; he held them just to wait for the only thing that would make him complete: Daisy. All he did was focus on Daisy who he felt was the only person that could bring him happiness, but it led him to being very absent from others’ lives. Nick was invited to a party at Gatsby’s house and when he arrived at his house he explains, “I made an attempt to find my host but the two or three people of whom I asked his whereabouts stared at me in such an amazed away and denied so vehemently any knowledge of his movements” (Fitzgerald 46). When one becomes an American they get very attached to certain things, which they believe will help them reach that destiny that they have spent their whole lives trying to achieve. When they do that though, it shows how much they have lost because they are focusing on things that do not benefit them or others. It is discussed in the novel when the young life of Gatsby is being described. Gatsby was so full of energy to go to many places and get out of the monotonous life that he was living. That passion went away when he was becoming an American because he got
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