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The Great Gatsby: Classmate Response

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Passage from text
Comments and Questions
Classmate Response
“Shucks, Tom,” I says, “I think you might tell a person. What’s a bar sinister?” “Oh, I don’t know. But he’s got to have it. All the nobility does” (Twain 259).
Through this quote, Twain expresses that when one does something without thinking it through, it is often unproductive. Tom got an idea for his plan from reading a book; however, he didn’t think through it and didn’t get what we planned for. In this situation, Tom is the opposite from me because I usually tend to think something through before and I stick to it. I don’t blindly make a plan, as Tom did.

Chapter:40
Passage from text
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Classmate Response
“I knowed he was white inside,
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Silas is also the name of a character in the book that I read for my first LWA book, The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown. However, they are much different types of people. Uncle Silas, in Huck Finn, is innocent, kind, and a preacher. Silas, in The Da Vinci Code, is the antagonist in the story and is extremely violent. Yet, they do have one thing in common, they are both affiliated with a church.

Chapter:42
Passage from text
Comments and Questions
Classmate Response
“The men was very huffy, and some of them wanted to hang Jim for an example to all the other niggers around there, so they wouldn’t be trying to run away like Jim done, and making such a raft of trouble, and keeping a whole family scared most to death for days and nights” (Twain 285).
This is an example of how whites ruled the blacks and is what almost causes Jim to be hanged. The whites don’t think the situation through and immediately want to kill him because he runs away; however, he is also black which is an even bigger reason. Back then, people were so cruel toward blacks and treated them with no respect at all. They were not seen as being equal to whites and therefore, were forced to be slaves or
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But I reckoned it was about as well the way it was” (Twain 292).
Although Tom never thinks of Jim as being worth anything for most of the novel, toward the end he begins so somewhat realize that Jim is more than he thought. He says that he will help Jim get freed and return back home to be happy and free, which doesn’t seem like something Tom would have done for Jim toward the beginning of the book. Throughout the book, Tom and Huck especially, grow to like Jim and figure out that his race doesn’t shape him as a person. Tom still doesn’t see Jim as being worth much; however, he has gained a better liking for him throughout the
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