The Great Gatsby Judgement Analysis

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Poor judgement is the stem of many issues, especially in the context of social situations. The blurred lines between right and wrong lead to poor choices and major complications, sometimes going as far as death. F. Scott Fitzgerald 's The Great Gatsby emphasises the idea that poor choices can lead to disastrous events. Nick Carraway is a close acquaintance of Jay Gatsby who ends up interfering in Gatsby 's fate and fates of others. Ironically he does so by doing nothing. Nick Carraway’s passive nature leads to the many mishaps in the novel, which stresses the idea that not being evil does not necessarily make someone a good person. ‘I’m inclined to reserve all judgements” (1) Nick states at the beginning of the novel, which instantly…show more content…
These passive instances extend to his relationship with Gatsby who he could have saved in one way or another. Nick promises Gatsby tea with Daisy, fully understanding that he is enabling an affair to go on between the two. He knows of Tom’s tendencies to resort to violence yet he goes on to act as a catalyst for the tryst that goes on between Gatsby and Daisy. This spells out trouble for the lovers yet Nick disregards it. Gatsby later expresses his desire to Nick about repeating the past with Daisy as if the last 5 years had never happened. “I’m going to fix everything just the way it was before”(110), Gatsby declares which Nick counters by telling him that he “can’t repeat the past” (110). This shows that Nick can see the ridiculousness of Gatsby 's plan and the troublesome path that it will take. However, when Gatsby shakes off his statement nick complacently bites his tongue leaving Gatsby to flounder in his…show more content…
Although Gatsby and Daisy are responsible for their own actions. Nick’s need to please Gatsby contributes to Gatsby’s demise. On the night of Myrtle’s death, Gatsby reveals to him that Daisy was the one driving the vehicle, declaring that “she’ll be alright tomorrow”(144) after saying that he would take the blame for the accident. Nick doesn’t advise him to rethink his decision. Gatsby deludes himself to care for Daisy to the point where is willing to take the fall for a crime that he did not commit. Even with this information he does not speak up and turn Daisy in even when he has no personal reason to withhold such information; he claims to be disgusted with his “old money” acquaintances, assuring Gatsby that they’re all “a rotten crowd”(154). In the first chapter, Gatsby is introduced as a gleaming beacon of hope for Nick “has never found in any other person and … [will] not likely ever find again”(2), and describing Gatsby as being “something gorgeous about him” (2). However, his reverence for Gatsby doesn’t do either of them any good in the long run. Nick’s concerns about keeping quiet for Gatsby lead to Gatsby’s demise. By withholding information Tom is able to frame Gatsby for the death of Myrtle and her infidelity, which leads to Wilson shooting Gatsby. These events could have been prevented had Nick spoken up about the matter, however his personal pledge to keep quiet about “the secret griefs of wild, unknown men”(1) stated
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