The Great Gatsby Loyalty Analysis

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Loyalty in the 1920s was a fading art, betrayal and lies lurked around every corner with the wealthy only becoming more corrupt with power and the poor struggling and doing anything to obtain it. Fitzgerald wrote his book in response to this movement of immoderation starting off showing its glamor but swiftly proceeding to the precipitous downfall it so often lead to. Fitzgerald made a true call to the youth of the 1920s to question the meaning of true loyalty in life and death of another human. He forever ingrained in the minds of generations of readers how humans really interpret loyalty from all walks of life. F. Scott Fitzgerald, in his novel The Great Gatsby, perfectly sums up the importance and fragility of loyalty. Within the novel…show more content…
Within a short period of time Nick finds himself essentially pledging his allegiance to Gatsby showing the start of one of the only unwavering loyalties in the novel. The exceptional part about Gatsby and Nick’s relationship is that all of the major relationships, with the exception of theirs and Myrtle and Wilson’s, were built on the opulent glamour seen throughout the book. Gatsby further proves the nature of this loyalty by offering Nick money for his help and being swiftly turned down. The foundation of loyalty was built on a mutual respect Nick himself even stated "You're worth the whole damn bunch put together." speaking in essence of everyone else in the novel. Wilson the only other example of unending loyalty in the novel constructed his foundation on pure unadulterated love. For no reason other than he saw at some point his entire life in Myrtle no matter what he was willing to prove even after she was gone he would die for…show more content…
First there is Wolfshiem's betrayal of Gatsby; while he feels remorse for the death of Gatsby he refuses to become involved because the true remorse he feels truly isn't the loss of Gatsby but the loss of Gatsby's wealth claiming “Let us learn to show our friendship for a man when he is alive and not after he is dead.” This is more explicitly shown when Klipspringer calls Nick, not to arrange to attend Gatsby's Funeral but to get his tennis shoes back proving he truly doesn’t care in the slightest about Gatsby but simply the material wealth that represented Gatsby. The only characters to attend Gatsby’s funeral where those who had loyalty built not on material bonds but a much stronger bond of respect and appreciation for the man he was not the man he had become. This proves the Fitzgeralds point of how fragile and carefully built loyalty must
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