The Great Gatsby Mood Analysis

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In F. Scott Fitzgerald’s, The Great Gatsby, he created a morale haze that intensified the characters complexity, which enhanced their characterization. Nick Carraway, the most complex of the characters presented so far, had a moral dilemma, though it did not appear that way. His use of thick vocabulary was used to establish his false moral superiority to convince the audience that he could be trusted, which allowed Fitzgerald to lure the audience into a psychological trap giving them the impression that Nick was reliable, thus creating the illusion that he was trustworthy. Nick’s hypocrisy, however, made it obvious that he was not reliable. Fitzgerald used his dilemma to create breadcrumbs of hints of his intense struggle throughout the first…show more content…
Fitzgerald used tone of the novel to create momentum, and it became clear in the opening chapters that, The Great Gatsby, was a very fast paced novel. Nick was the prime beneficiary of tone during these chapters because Fitzgerald did not need to develop him as much because he had to focus on his supporting cast, as a result it gave Nick a semi-mysterious image, and benefited him as an unreliable narrator. The tone of the novel was comparable to that of the 1920’s, as it captured the fast pace of the time period, and bottled it up into a…show more content…
The Valley of Ashes symbolized poverty, and Fitzgerald succeeded at portraying the Valley of Ashes as this impoverished area via imagery. Fitzgerald glorified the color grey in the area, and described the area as this grotesque uninhabitable place to live, as a result it impacted the mood of chapter two, creating this depressed atmosphere that gloomed over the residents. To further enhance the gloominess of The Valley of Ashes, Fitzgerald also used the weather to his advantage, it was never sunny, the sky was always grey, and it played along with the color theme of the
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